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Adopted As Holograph – Adopted As Holograph (Holograph)


3 stars
Former uncle John and Whitelock stalwart David Philp is the crooning 
mastermind behind this seven song set of post-modern Palm Court swing 
awash with fiddle, accordion and acoustic guitar, which sounds at times 
not unlike The Monochrome Set gone retro zydeco. As wryly jaunty as all 
this sounds, there's a doleful melancholy to Philp's delivery, which 
nevertheless retains a trad warmth worth waltzing to.

The List, April 2013

ends




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