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Famous Five – Young Marble Giants, The Pop Group, Vic Godard & Subway Sect, The Sexual Objects, Pere Ubu

Young Marble Giants

The minimal palette of Cardiff trio Young Marble Giants' first and only album, Colossal Youth, remains as spooky and as fragile today as it was when it crept quietly into the post-punk landscape in 1980.


The Pop Group

Bristol's incendiary troupe of avant-punk insurrectionists return after this year's Celtic Connections show to perform their just repressed We Are Time album in full. Manic dub-funk sloganeering dangerous enough to bring down governments.


Vic Godard & Subway Sect

Subway Sect's support slot on the Edinburgh Playhouse date of The Clash's May 1977 White Riot tour at Edinburgh Playhouse inspired what would become The Sound of Young Scotland. Godard's re-recordings of his vintage northern soul period can be heard on 1979 Now.


The Sexual Objects

One of those attending the Edinburgh White Riot date was Davy Henderson, who formed Fire Engines, Win and The Nectarine No 9 before morphing into The SOBs, who have frequently backed Godard. Pop Group guitarist Gareth Sager collaborated with The Nectarine No 9, and when PG drummer Bruce Smith is on PiL duty, SOBs drummer Ian Holford has been known to step into the breach.


Pere Ubu

Crawling out of Cleveland, Ohio in 1975 and named after Alfred Jarry's proto-absurdist play, David Thomas' antsy sci-fi-fused garage-band have just released their latest album, Carnival of Souls. In 1981, YMG bassist Phil Moxham played on Thomas' solo record, The Sound of The Sand.


Young Marble Giants, Stereo, Glasgow, Oct 20th; The Pop Group, Voodoo Rooms, Edinburgh, Oct 20th; Vic Godard & Subway Sect with The Sexual Objects, Voodoo Rooms, Edinburgh, Nov 15th; Pere Ubu, Voodoo Rooms, Edinburgh, Nov 18th.



ends

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