Tuesday, 27 March 2012

The Marriage of Figaro


Royal Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh
4 stars
Love, sex and money are all the rage in D.C. Jackson's ribald 
twenty-first century re-telling of Beaumarchais' eighteenth century 
romp. In Jackson's world, Figaro is a thrusting young banker in 
partnership with his equally on the make squeeze, Suzanne. Together 
they're about to merge with a top-floor firm that will make them the 
biggest financial institution in Scotland. To get there, the young 
lovers must negotiate their way around a series of increasingly 
compromising positions involving an even more lascivious power couple, 
predatory PA Margery, a cross-dressing Ukrainian office boy-toy and an 
overdose of Glass Ceiling perfume by Jackie Collins.

Thatcher's children are alive and kicking in Mark Thomson's production, 
which, while peppered throughout with a series of trademark  spiky 
one-liners by Jackson, also shows off a new-found maturity from a 
writer who seems to have moved on from adolescent fumbling. If the 
tub-thumping anti-capitalist polemic at the end states the obvious, it 
nevertheless feels very much of the moment.

In the main, Jackson's script allows Thomson's cast to explore the 
full grotesquerie of how money talks. While Mark Prendergast and Nicola 
Roy make a handsome couple, Molly Innes' Margery and Jamie Quinn's 
Pavlo provide much of the play's comic drive. It's Stuart Bowman's 
explosive Sir Randy, however, who provides the play's amoral compass, 
his mixture of self-important pomp and unintentional ridiculousness 
falling somewhere between Fred Goodwin and Charles Endall Esquire, 
bankrupt on every level in a comedy of considerable power.

The Herald, March 26th 2012

ends

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