Skip to main content

The View - Rory Middleton Gets Cryptic


One of Rory Middleton's earliest memories is of a childhood holiday 
with his family. This isn't unusual in itself, except for the fact that 
his free-spirited parents never booked any accommodation in advance, 
but would wing it once they reached their destination. One time they 
arrived in Greece at around two in the morning, and, with Middleton in 
tow, ended up sleeping in a graveyard. Once they did find somewhere 
with a roof over their heads, misunderstandings due to the language 
barrier saw them wind up in a kitchen full of chickens.

Exposure to such environments has clearly fed into Middleton's own 
adventures in imaginary landscapes, the latest of which, The View, 
takes its audience on a bus trip to Cove Park in Argyll as the latest 
in the Cryptic company's Cryptic Nights series of one-off events. Where 
previous Cryptic Nights have explored works in progress in the CCA's 
state of art auditorium, The View gets back to nature with a panoramic 
architectural installation, as Middleton explains.

“It was originally conceived in the Rocky Mountains,” he says, already 
in residence in Cove Park following a three-week recce. “I was looking 
at the forest, stripping things back until I focused on this one 
particular view. Then I built this frame, which gave things this 
strange hyper-reality, and I did lots of field recordings as well, so 
the forest became amplified both in terms of sound and vision, and it 
became this kind of meditation. As it got to dusk, this view literally 
did glow. There was something about the forest that had its own 
mystique, and I think I've found somewhere equally special in Cove 
Park, although it's going to be a lot different here.”

As well as the Rocky Mountain version of The View, previous works by 
Middleton have included an infinity swimming pool on the terrace of a 
sixth floor building in Zagreb, while he's just completed a six month 
residency in the far snowier climes of Fogo Island in Canada, where he 
created something resembling a house made of ice. Projected onto the 
back of the structure was an out of focus sunset.

“Fogo was really dependent on the weather,” Middleton points out, “and 
there ended up being this massive snowstorm, and I went out one day and 
the entire construction had gone.”

Middleton has also been working on a film that follows the flight of an 
eagle through a modernist building.

“Everything I do is site-specific,” he says. “It's not just about 
transferring a work from one place to another. I never like to repeat 
myself in that way. Each work develops into something else as it goes, 
and tries to highlight something that's already there, but which people 
might never notice. It's very subtle, as if you're turning up the 
volume on something by one notch, but no more.”

As his conversation suggests, sound too is integral to his work, and, 
as in the Rockies, the Cove Park version of The View will incorporate a 
live score. Where the Rockies incorporated electric guitar loops into 
its atmosphere, Cove Park will utilise percussion played by drummer 
Iain Stewart of Bronco Skylift and The Phantom Band.

“He's going to be in the woods,” Middleton explains, “responding to the 
surroundings with a lot of amplified sounds. In the Rockies the 
electric guitar created a kind of wall of sound that gave an industrial 
context in this forest environment, but in Cove Park percussion feels 
right. I would actually like Iain to be completely hidden, so people 
don't realise that it's a live drummer that's attempting to create a 
lot of echo in the valley. Again, it's all about creating an atmosphere 
that allows people to focus on what they're seeing and hearing.”

Middleton came to art relatively late. After leaving school, his 
dyslexia led him away from word-based pursuits. He worked first as a 
joiner, then went to Israel, where he ended up working in a zoo. On 
moving back to Glasgow, he worked in a bar for a while before realising 
he wanted more, and decided to become a painter. That grew less 
attractive when both he and the carpet would end up covered in paint. 
It was only in his foundation year that he discovered sculpture.

“That was a real eye-opener,” Middleton says today.

Opting to train in Falmouth in Cornwall rather than Glasgow helped 
shape his work even more.
“Glasgow would've been great on one level,” he says, “but Cornwall gave me the space to develop my own style, which is large-scale. It's quite difficult to find opportunities to do what I do, so you have to stick with it. But this is something I always wanted to maintain, having control over environments.” On paper, at least, Middleton's work sounds akin to Angus Farquhar's epic manipulations of open-air spaces with his NVA company. While Middleton knows them by reputation, he's never actually witnessed any of Farquhar's work, so is unable to confirm or deny any similarities. “The pieces I've heard about sound really magical,” says Middleton, “but I can't really say that I've been inspired by them or anything, simply because I've never seen anything they've done. I get the impression, though, that they're getting people to work in 360 degree landscapes, whereas I'm trying to get people to look at something more specific. ” Inbetween creating environments, Middleton maintains a sideline as a carpenter, something he's kept up since leaving Falmouth, when he went to London and worked at Pinewood film studios. After working eighteen hour days, he was on a train to Glasgow when the call came from Pinewood's construction manager asking him to stand in for him for six months. The first thing Middleton built on his return to Pinewood was a house. “That was a massive learning curve,” he says. The house was used, appropriately enough, in construction workers abroad drama, Auf Wiedersehn, Pet. Middleton also worked on BBC costume dramas before returning to Glasgow, where he gained his Masters of Fine art degree with a sculptural structure of a mountain with a house on top. “That was when I discovered it was landscape I was interested in, but making my own landscape,” he says. “I want them to be on a scale where I can use the whole environment, so, rather than try and adapt my ideas for a gallery, you've got a much bigger place to work, where you don't have to worry about a white box, but have this space to think about things.” Beyond The View, there are already plans afoot for Middleton to create a new work in Calgary, again in Canada. Again, this will see Middleton react to the great outdoors in his own particular fashion. “Working outside is good because there aren't any real boundaries,” he says. “If you're sensible about things, there are no real health and safety issues either, whereas if you're working in a space with windows, that completely changes any atmosphere you're trying to create. But I don't know if there is an ultimate environment. I'm just happy wherever I am.” The View, March 29-30, Cove Park. Bus departs CCA, Glasgow. 6.15pm. www.ccaglasgow.ticketsolve.com www.crypticnights.org.uk

The Herald, March 29th 2012

ends

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Losing Touch With My Mind - Psychedelia in Britain 1986-1990

DISC 1 1. THE STONE ROSES   -  Don’t Stop 2. SPACEMEN 3   -  Losing Touch With My Mind (Demo) 3. THE MODERN ART   -  Mind Train 4. 14 ICED BEARS   -  Mother Sleep 5. RED CHAIR FADEAWAY  -  Myra 6. BIFF BANG POW!   -  Five Minutes In The Life Of Greenwood Goulding 7. THE STAIRS  -  I Remember A Day 8. THE PRISONERS  -  In From The Cold 9. THE TELESCOPES   -  Everso 10. THE SEERS   -  Psych Out 11. MAGIC MUSHROOM BAND  -  You Can Be My L-S-D 12. THE HONEY SMUGGLERS  - Smokey Ice-Cream 13. THE MOONFLOWERS  -  We Dig Your Earth 14. THE SUGAR BATTLE   -  Colliding Minds 15. GOL GAPPAS   -  Albert Parker 16. PAUL ROLAND  -  In The Opium Den 17. THE THANES  -  Days Go Slowly By 18. THEE HYPNOTICS   -  Justice In Freedom (12" Version) 1. THE STONE ROSES    Don’t Stop ( Silvertone   ORE   1989) The trip didn’t quite start here for what sounds like Waterfall played backwards on The Stone Roses’ era-defining eponymous debut album, but it sounds

Big Gold Dreams – A Story of Scottish Independent Music 1977-1989

Disc 1 1. THE REZILLOS (My Baby Does) Good Sculptures (12/77)  2. THE EXILE Hooked On You (8/77) 3. DRIVE Jerkin’ (8/77) 4. VALVES Robot Love (9/77) 5. P.V.C. 2 Put You In The Picture (10/77) 6. JOHNNY & THE SELF ABUSERS Dead Vandals (11/77) 7. BEE BEE CEE You Gotta Know Girl (11/77) 8. SUBS Gimme Your Heart (2/78) 9. SKIDS Reasons (No Bad NB 1, 4/78) 10. FINGERPRINTZ Dancing With Myself (1/79)  11. THE ZIPS Take Me Down (4/79) 12. ANOTHER PRETTY FACE All The Boys Love Carrie (5/79)  13. VISITORS Electric Heat (5/79) 14. JOLT See Saw (6/79) 15. SIMPLE MINDS Chelsea Girl (6/79) 16. SHAKE Culture Shock (7/79) 17. HEADBOYS The Shape Of Things To Come (7/79) 18. FIRE EXIT Time Wall (8/79) 19. FREEZE Paranoia (9/79) 20. FAKES Sylvia Clarke (9/79) 21. TPI She’s Too Clever For Me (10/79) 22. FUN 4 Singing In The Showers (11/79) 23. FLOWERS Confessions (12/79) 24. TV21 Playing With Fire (4/80) 25. ALEX FERGUSSON Stay With Me Tonight (1980) 1. THE REZILL

Edinburgh Rocks – The Capital's Music Scene in the 1950s and Early 1960s

Edinburgh has always been a vintage city. Yet, for youngsters growing up in the shadow of World War Two as well as a pervading air of tight-lipped Calvinism, they were dreich times indeed. The founding of the Edinburgh International Festival in 1947 and the subsequent Fringe it spawned may have livened up the city for a couple of weeks in August as long as you were fans of theatre, opera and classical music, but the pubs still shut early, and on Sundays weren't open at all. But Edinburgh too has always had a flipside beyond such official channels, and, in a twitch-hipped expression of the sort of cultural duality Robert Louis Stevenson recognised in his novel, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, a vibrant dance-hall scene grew up across the city. Audiences flocked to emporiums such as the Cavendish in Tollcross, the Eldorado in Leith, The Plaza in Morningside and, most glamorous of all due to its revolving stage, the Palais in Fountainbridge. Here the likes of Joe Loss and Ted Heath broug