Skip to main content

Citizens Theatre Spring Season 2008

When tickets go on sale next week for the Citizens Theatre’s Spring 2008 season - revealed exclusively in The Herald today- it will mark something of a watershed for its joint artistic directors, Jeremy Raison and Guy Hollands. Because Hollands’ appearance directing both a main-stage classic and a brand new studio piece aimed specifically at an 8-12 year old age group suggests the ongoing realignment between The Citz and TAG is now in place.

Yet no longer will the second company be regarded as ‘merely’ its big brother’s young people theatre wing as it was sometimes regarded when founded 40 years ago. Rather, following a good few years when it at times appeared to be a stepping stone for directors to tick the worthy box with en route to somewhere else (former directors Ian Wooldridge went to Edinburgh’s Royal Lyceum, Ian Brown to The Traverse then West Yorkshire Playhouse and James Brining to Dundee Rep), TAG is fully in tune with its remit once more while able to capitalise on the increasing respect for young peoples theatre as a significant art-form in itself.

So while the season’s flag-ship production will be Hollands’ main-stage look at Samuel Beckett’s Waiting For Godot, Liar is a new work by Davey Anderson which marks the culmination of two years of development in association with mixed ability musical specialists Sound Of Progress. While Liar’s remit is clear, if Godot isn’t already on the school syllabus, then this seminal piece of existential vaudeville certainly should be. Add on a main stage production of They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? by an alliance of the theatre’s Community Company, Young Company plus new company members from Turning Point Scotland, as a follow-up to this year’s Ice Cream Dreams, and it’s clear how inclusively broad the Citz/TAG axis has become.

“It’s all about joined-up thinking,” Hollands observes, “which is something neither company has ever really capitalised on to any great extent. You’ve has this great award winning company for children and young people associated with the Citizens Theatre, but its never really had the philosophical space to explore that. This is a natural progression of what’s happened since I came here, and is about playing to out strengths.”

Not, to be honest, that such an apparent change of attitude is anything new. TAG and The Citz have been marketing work from one central pool for well over a year now, culminating in the success story of David Greig’s play, Yellow Moon, directed by Hollands for TAG. What the two new shows specifically directed by Hollands do signal, however, is that there will be greater fluidity and interaction between the two wings of the company than before. What resolutely won’t happen according to Hollands is that one company regarded up till now as the junior partner is gradually absorbed by the other to the extent that its brand disappears.

To illustrate this at a simplistic level somewhat in keeping with the youthful concerns of the two theatre companies, this is what used to happen in the world of children’s comics, whereby a struggling weekly would join forces with a best-seller. Initially advertised as two comics for the price of one, before long the masthead of the weaker party would be printed in increasingly smaller type until it was completely absorbed and its old identity removed from view entirely.

If anything, though, The Citizens Theatre and TAG is simply running different strands of work in parallel. Hollands’ influence will also open up the Citizens to shows produced by Imaginate for the Edinburgh-based Children’s International Theatre Festival. In a more grown-up vein, Raison will adapt Ron Butlin’s Glasgow-set novel, The Sound Of My Voice.

As well as the shows highlighted, The Citz will lead two co-productions involving the national theatre Of Scotland. David Harrower’s version of Pirandello’s Six Characters In Search Of An Author will continue the relationship between the Gorbals based theatre and Edinburgh’s Royal Lyceum forged via Harrower’s adaptation of Mary Stuart. Continuing the new work strand will be Vanishing Point, whose Subway was a smash hit at this year’s Edinburgh Festival Fringe, and who will lead a co-production of Little Otik, adapted for the stage from Czech film director Jan Svankmajer’s twisted fairytale.

Highlights of visiting shows include The Arches production of Brian Friel’s Translations and Replico Theatre’s new look at David Hare’s take on La Ronde, The Blue Room. It’s the work for young people though, that stands out simply for being treated on an equal footing.

“There seems to be a cultural shift going on.” says Hollands, “and that’s partly down to the trail-blazing work TAG’s been doing for years, and partly what Imaginate have been doing in bringing over a lot of work from abroad. Both of those have demonstrated how important that sector is, and that’s something TAG and The Citizens are capitalising on now.”

Tickets for The Citizens Theatre’s spring season go on sale on Monday November 26
www.citz.co.uk

The Herald, November 20th 2007

ends

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Losing Touch With My Mind - Psychedelia in Britain 1986-1990

DISC 1 1. THE STONE ROSES   -  Don’t Stop 2. SPACEMEN 3   -  Losing Touch With My Mind (Demo) 3. THE MODERN ART   -  Mind Train 4. 14 ICED BEARS   -  Mother Sleep 5. RED CHAIR FADEAWAY  -  Myra 6. BIFF BANG POW!   -  Five Minutes In The Life Of Greenwood Goulding 7. THE STAIRS  -  I Remember A Day 8. THE PRISONERS  -  In From The Cold 9. THE TELESCOPES   -  Everso 10. THE SEERS   -  Psych Out 11. MAGIC MUSHROOM BAND  -  You Can Be My L-S-D 12. THE HONEY SMUGGLERS  - Smokey Ice-Cream 13. THE MOONFLOWERS  -  We Dig Your Earth 14. THE SUGAR BATTLE   -  Colliding Minds 15. GOL GAPPAS   -  Albert Parker 16. PAUL ROLAND  -  In The Opium Den 17. THE THANES  -  Days Go Slowly By 18. THEE HYPNOTICS   -  Justice In Freedom (12" Version) 1. THE STONE ROSES    Don’t Stop ( Silvertone   ORE   1989) The trip didn’t quite start here for what sounds like Waterfall played backwards on The Stone Roses’ era-defining eponymous debut album, but it sounds

Big Gold Dreams – A Story of Scottish Independent Music 1977-1989

Disc 1 1. THE REZILLOS (My Baby Does) Good Sculptures (12/77)  2. THE EXILE Hooked On You (8/77) 3. DRIVE Jerkin’ (8/77) 4. VALVES Robot Love (9/77) 5. P.V.C. 2 Put You In The Picture (10/77) 6. JOHNNY & THE SELF ABUSERS Dead Vandals (11/77) 7. BEE BEE CEE You Gotta Know Girl (11/77) 8. SUBS Gimme Your Heart (2/78) 9. SKIDS Reasons (No Bad NB 1, 4/78) 10. FINGERPRINTZ Dancing With Myself (1/79)  11. THE ZIPS Take Me Down (4/79) 12. ANOTHER PRETTY FACE All The Boys Love Carrie (5/79)  13. VISITORS Electric Heat (5/79) 14. JOLT See Saw (6/79) 15. SIMPLE MINDS Chelsea Girl (6/79) 16. SHAKE Culture Shock (7/79) 17. HEADBOYS The Shape Of Things To Come (7/79) 18. FIRE EXIT Time Wall (8/79) 19. FREEZE Paranoia (9/79) 20. FAKES Sylvia Clarke (9/79) 21. TPI She’s Too Clever For Me (10/79) 22. FUN 4 Singing In The Showers (11/79) 23. FLOWERS Confessions (12/79) 24. TV21 Playing With Fire (4/80) 25. ALEX FERGUSSON Stay With Me Tonight (1980) 1. THE REZILL

Edinburgh Rocks – The Capital's Music Scene in the 1950s and Early 1960s

Edinburgh has always been a vintage city. Yet, for youngsters growing up in the shadow of World War Two as well as a pervading air of tight-lipped Calvinism, they were dreich times indeed. The founding of the Edinburgh International Festival in 1947 and the subsequent Fringe it spawned may have livened up the city for a couple of weeks in August as long as you were fans of theatre, opera and classical music, but the pubs still shut early, and on Sundays weren't open at all. But Edinburgh too has always had a flipside beyond such official channels, and, in a twitch-hipped expression of the sort of cultural duality Robert Louis Stevenson recognised in his novel, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, a vibrant dance-hall scene grew up across the city. Audiences flocked to emporiums such as the Cavendish in Tollcross, the Eldorado in Leith, The Plaza in Morningside and, most glamorous of all due to its revolving stage, the Palais in Fountainbridge. Here the likes of Joe Loss and Ted Heath broug