Skip to main content

Resolution Concert

Princes Street Gardens, Edinburgh
4 stars
In the unlikely event of KT Tunstall’s musical career ever going belly
up, she could easily make the grade as a presenter on a par with her
Fife compatriot Edith Bowman. Or that’s the impression Ms Tunstall gave
fronting this New Year’s Day initiative which she curated all her
support acts before playing a full set herself. As one might expect
given Tunstall’s roots, it’s largely a Fence Collective heavy affair.

Silver Columns, aka Pictish Trail and Adem, kick things off with a
short set of gay disco electronica that’s quite odd to hear at teatime
rather than at midnight in a club, but which warms things up nicely
anyway. Glasgow sextet Kassidy are hirsute enough to look like the
1970s classic rock band their sound already resembles while looking
like they’ve stepped out of a spaghetti western, while Tunstall joins
her mentor King Creosote, aka Kenny Anderson, on backing vocals for one
song before Anderson launches into the manic euphoria of The Happy
Song.

All of the above is rattled through in just over an hour, after which
Tunstall returns sporting a fetching pair of sparkly pantomime pants
and a mouth-loads of banter. The next hour’s worth of songs is
delivered with such infectious pep that it’s hard to dislike Tunstall
or her band featuring former Ash guitarist Charlotte Hatherly. There
may be missed cues, a bash on the head from a microphone and an
unlikely cover of Erasure’s A Little Respect that takes three attempts
to get going, but Tunstall is charm itself. Finally, Suddenly I See
gets the Princes Street crowd bouncing in what must surely be the most
upbeat start to the year ever.

The Herald, January 3rd 2011

ends

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Big Gold Dreams – A Story of Scottish Independent Music 1977-1989

Disc 1 1. THE REZILLOS (My Baby Does) Good Sculptures (12/77)  2. THE EXILE Hooked On You (8/77) 3. DRIVE Jerkin’ (8/77) 4. VALVES Robot Love (9/77) 5. P.V.C. 2 Put You In The Picture (10/77) 6. JOHNNY & THE SELF ABUSERS Dead Vandals (11/77) 7. BEE BEE CEE You Gotta Know Girl (11/77) 8. SUBS Gimme Your Heart (2/78) 9. SKIDS Reasons (No Bad NB 1, 4/78) 10. FINGERPRINTZ Dancing With Myself (1/79)  11. THE ZIPS Take Me Down (4/79) 12. ANOTHER PRETTY FACE All The Boys Love Carrie (5/79)  13. VISITORS Electric Heat (5/79) 14. JOLT See Saw (6/79) 15. SIMPLE MINDS Chelsea Girl (6/79) 16. SHAKE Culture Shock (7/79) 17. HEADBOYS The Shape Of Things To Come (7/79) 18. FIRE EXIT Time Wall (8/79) 19. FREEZE Paranoia (9/79) 20. FAKES Sylvia Clarke (9/79) 21. TPI She’s Too Clever For Me (10/79) 22. FUN 4 Singing In The Showers (11/79) 23. FLOWERS Confessions (12/79) 24. TV21 Playing With Fire (4/80) 25. ALEX FERGUSSON Stay With Me Tonight (1980) 1. THE REZILL

Losing Touch With My Mind - Psychedelia in Britain 1986-1990

DISC 1 1. THE STONE ROSES   -  Don’t Stop 2. SPACEMEN 3   -  Losing Touch With My Mind (Demo) 3. THE MODERN ART   -  Mind Train 4. 14 ICED BEARS   -  Mother Sleep 5. RED CHAIR FADEAWAY  -  Myra 6. BIFF BANG POW!   -  Five Minutes In The Life Of Greenwood Goulding 7. THE STAIRS  -  I Remember A Day 8. THE PRISONERS  -  In From The Cold 9. THE TELESCOPES   -  Everso 10. THE SEERS   -  Psych Out 11. MAGIC MUSHROOM BAND  -  You Can Be My L-S-D 12. THE HONEY SMUGGLERS  - Smokey Ice-Cream 13. THE MOONFLOWERS  -  We Dig Your Earth 14. THE SUGAR BATTLE   -  Colliding Minds 15. GOL GAPPAS   -  Albert Parker 16. PAUL ROLAND  -  In The Opium Den 17. THE THANES  -  Days Go Slowly By 18. THEE HYPNOTICS   -  Justice In Freedom (12" Version) 1. THE STONE ROSES    Don’t Stop ( Silvertone   ORE   1989) The trip didn’t quite start here for what sounds like Waterfall played backwards on The Stone Roses’ era-defining eponymous debut album, but it sounds

Clybourne Park

Adam Smith Theatre, Kirkcaldy Four Stars It’s a case of whoops, there goes the neighbourhood twice over in Rapture Theatre’s revival of Bruce Norris’ Pulitzer Prize-winning play, which opens in 1959 in the same Chicago suburb where Lorraine Hansberry’s drama, A Raisin in the Sun, which appeared that year, is set. Here, Robin Kingsland’s Russ and his wife Bev, played by Jackie Morrison, are preparing to move out of their now almost empty des-res following a family tragedy. Unknown to them, the bargain basement price tag has enabled a black family to move in, with Jack Lord’s uptight Karl a self-appointed spokesperson for the entire ‘hood. Russ and Bev’s black maid Francine (Adelaide Obeng) and her husband Albert (Vinta Morgan), meanwhile, bear witness to a barrage of everyday racism. Fast forward half a century, and a white family are trying to buy the same house, albeit with a heap of proposed changes which the black couple representing the block’s now much more diverse comm