Skip to main content

Edinburgh Festival Fringe Reviews 3 - Expensive Shit- Traverse Theatre, Four stars / In Fidelity - Traverse Theatre, Four stars / High Heels in Low Places - Traverse Theatre, Four stars

In Expensive Shit, a Nigerian toilet attendant called Tolu ekes out a living on tips from dressed up women on the pull in a Glasgow nightclub. Once upon a time Tolu had dreams of being a dancer in revolutionary musician Fela Kuti's band in his Lagos-based Shrine club. In different ways, both establishments turn women into objects, especially when it is revealed that the Glasgow club toilets is fitted with a two-way mirror so men can observe the women from a room on the other side of the wall.

Inspired by a real-life instance in Glasgow, Adura Onashile's play, presented by Scottish Theatre producers in association with the Traverse, flits between the Glasgow club and the Shrine. This charts Tolu's thwarted ambitions to her near invisibility before rediscovering something within herself.

Sabina Cameron invests Tolu with a proud defiance in Onashile's own production, in which three other actresses flit between locations on what in one way or another might just be the time of the women's lives. When they rise up, it may be for one night only, but its reclaiming of power is a fleeting moment of emancipation for all.

Runs to August 28

Love is in the air in In Fidelity, Rob Drummond's latest auto-biographical dissection of human behaviour. After becoming a wrestler and a magician, here Drummond uses the tropes of increasingly grotesque TV dating shows to get to the heart of a matter that affects us all. As a gift to his real life wife on their fifteenth anniversary, Drummond co-opts members of the audience to run through the pros and cons of the dating game.

Drummond makes for a charming host, who rolls with any awkwardness between participants like a pro. It is the scripted segments that really open things up in Steven Atkinson's production, where personal ethics regarding any temptation to stray veers more towards Oprah territory than Blind Date. What makes this streets ahead of many of the straight-up confessional shows doing the rounds is Drummond's artfulness and innate understanding of theatre's contrary relationship with truth and lies. Throw sex and death into the mix and its a winner, and if the show's final moment doesn't leave you with a lump in your throat, then you're probably a lost cause to love anyway.

Runs to August 28

In High Heels in Low Places, self-styled queen of Ireland Panti Bliss comes clean on how a solitary remark on a TV chat show created the sort of media storm that is becoming increasingly rabid these days. As a sparkling and potty-mouthed Panti makes plain, however, beyond the initial furore, s/he transcended the manufactured outrage to become a national treasure.

Over the next motor-mouthed seventy minutes, Panti rewinds on a no-holds-barred life as a drag queen in a scurrilous and hilarious fashion. Beyond the gossip, such a display undercuts itself with a searing and fearlessly unsentimental honesty that turns the entire performance into an act of defiance that gives homophobes the serious finger.

While seeing a show like this in such a formal theatrical environment at 10.30 in the morning for the first date of the Traverse's revolving programme was initially disarming, it nevertheless gets back to drag culture's politically driven roots as Panti lays bare her small town roots before coming out fighting as a liberating force for good. And yes, the finale features a magnificent display of lip-synching that makes for the ultimate gay club experience, whatever time of day it might be.

Runs to August 14th

The Herald, August 16th 2016

ends

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Peter Brook – The Prisoner

Peter Brook is no stranger to Scotland, ever since the guru of European and world theatre first brought his nine-hour epic, The Mahabharata, to Glasgow in 1988. That was at the city’s old transport museum, which by 1990 had become Tramway, the still-functioning permanent venue that opened up Glasgow and Scotland as a major channel for international theatre in a way that had previously only been on offer at Edinburgh International Festival.
Brook and his Paris-based Theatre des Bouffes du Nord company’s relationship with Tramway saw him bring his productions of La Tragedie de Carmen, La Tempete, Pellease et Mellisande, The Man Who…, and Oh Les Beaux Jours – the French version of Samuel Beckett’s Happy Days – to Glasgow.
Thirty years on from The Mahabharata, Brook comes to EIF with another piece of pan-global theatre as part of a residency by Theatre des Bouffes du Nord, which Brook has led since he decamped to Paris from London in the early 1970s. The current Edinburgh residency has alr…

Romeo And Juliet - Shakespeare's Globe Comes to Glasgow

Open-air Shakepeares are a summer-time perennial of the theatre calendar, attracting picnicking audiences as much as midges. More often than not, such romps through the grass are frothy, heritage industry affairs designed to be accompanied by strawberries and cream and not to be taken too seriously. Shakespeare’s Globe theatre company look set to change such perceptions when they open their outdoor tour of Romeo And Juliet in Glasgow next week as part of the West End festival.

For the two young actors taking the title roles of the doomed lovers, it will also be something of a homecoming. Richard Madden and Ellie Piercy both studied in Glasgow prior to turning professional. Indeed, Madden has yet to graduate from the acting course at RSAMD, and, as well as facing the pressures of playing such a meaty role in close proximity to the audience, will have the added anxiety of being assessed and graded by his tutors.

“This is the end of my third year,” says Madden following a Saturday mornin…

Suzy Glass – Message from the Skies

Freedom of movement matters to Suzy Glass, the arts and events producer currently overseeing the second edition of Message from the Skies.This animated literary derive around the city forms part of this year’s Edinburgh’s Hogmanay programme, and runs right through till Burns’ Night. Glass’ concerns are inherent in the event itself, which has commissioned six writers from different disciplines and experiences to each pen a love letter to Europe. Each writer has then paired up with a composer and visual artist or film-maker, with the results of each collaboration projected in monumental fashion on the walls of one of half a dozen of the capital’s most iconic buildings.
With venues stretching from the south side of Edinburgh to Leith, and with one city centre stop requiring a walk up Calton Hill, there is considerable legwork required to complete the circuit. It shouldn’t be considered a race, however, and audiences are free to move between venues at their leisure, visiting each site on d…